Video: Conrizzle “From The Struggle to The Stage” Documentary (Trailer #2)

The road to CranGrape & White Girls continues with trailer number 2 from the documentary featuring the song “The Elephant” which will appear on the album and also has some appearances from a couple of gorgeous girls. “CranGrape & White Girls” aka The Best Album of the SUMMER! Comes out on June 28th!! – Con

And if you’re in the VA area hit up Con’s show on later this month on the 24th @ The Camel in Richmond.

Technology News: Apple iOS 5

Apple today previewed iOS 5, the latest version of the world’s most advanced mobile operating system, and released a beta version to iOS Developer Program members. The iOS 5 beta release includes over 200 new features that will be available to iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users this fall. We break down the key highlights and add some information on each below. Further updates regarding these latest developments from Apple are available through the official Apple website.

I cant wait til Fall. More info after the jump.

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Cool Stuff: ColorWare x Beats By Dr. Dre (Chrome Headphones)

Make a statement of exclusivity via the new partnership between Beats by Dr. Dre and customizer ColorWare. Introducing the new Beats Chrome Headphones with shimmering chrome finishes. With patented X2 coating, a process invented by the Minnesota-base ColorWare, the metallic-like chrome finish isn’t just the usual electroplating of chromium, but a plastic resin that in actually more scratch resistant. Each numbered and engraved with a special ColorWare Collection emblem, only 50 pairs will be available through ColorWare at a price of $1000 each.

More shots down bottom.

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Health News: Canadian Scientists Develop Drug That Can Erase Bad Memories

Recalling painful memories while under the influence of the drug metyrapone reduces the brain’s ability to re-record the negative emotions associated with them, according to University of Montreal researchers at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress of Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital. The team’s study challenges the theory that memories cannot be modified once they are stored in the brain.

“Metyrapone is a drug that significantly decreases the levels of cortisol, a stress hormone that is involved in memory recall,” explained lead author Marie-France Marin. Manipulating cortisol close to the time of forming new memories can decrease the negative emotions that may be associated with them. “The results show that when we decrease stress hormone levels at the time of recall of a negative event, we can impair the memory for this negative event with a long-lasting effect,” said Dr. Sonia Lupien, who directed the research.

Thirty-three men participated in the study, which involved learning a story composed of neutral and negative events. Three days later, they were divided into three groups — participants in the first group received a single dose of metyrapone, the second received double, while the third were given placebo. They were then asked to remember the story. Their memory performance was then evaluated again four days later, once the drug had cleared out.. “We found that the men in the group who received two doses of metyrapone were impaired when retrieving the negative events of the story, while they showed no impairment recalling the neutral parts of the story,” Marin explained. “We were surprised that the decreased memory of negative information was still present once cortisol levels had returned to normal.”

The research offers hope to people suffering from syndromes such as post-traumatic stress disorder. “Our findings may help people deal with traumatic events by offering them the opportunity to ‘write-over’ the emotional part of their memories during therapy,” Marin said. One major hurdle, however, is the fact that metyrapone is no longer commercially produced. Nevertheless, the findings are very promising in terms of future clinical treatments. “Other drugs also decrease cortisol levels, and further studies with these compounds will enable us to gain a better understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in the modulation of negative memories.”

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